The Perils of Decision Fatigue

It occurred to me this weekend that I am beginning to suffer from a kind of global decision fatigue.

I only recently ran across this term. Someone used it in conjunction with sticking to a diet plan, and how many of us can do so up to a certain point in the day, when decision fatigue sets in. The article went on to list ways in which you could fatigue-proof your diet plans so you didn’t fall victim to bad food choices late in the day or when you were under stress. I thought it a useful term and made note of the points in the article.

I think it’s similar in some ways to compassion fatigue, in which caregivers or people in the health professions, such as doctors or nurses, burn out on the emotional demands of their jobs.

And I’ve got another one for you that I made up just now: fear fatigue. It goes hand-in-hand with its partner in crime, outrage fatigue. Because at some point I have to look at the headlines that say we’re all going to die from a) an imminent pandemic (it’s just a matter of time) b) catastrophic climate change (also a matter of time) c) global war (which will probably get us first, given the current administration), so I don’t have to worry about losing my Social Security or Medicare or health insurance because I’ll already be dead. That’s what clicking on the news does for me these days. Paired with the sickening and terrifying changes in policy within this country, I’m glad on some level I still can be outraged and afraid.

But the fatigue is setting in.

All of it is coming to a head with the decision fatigue. I’ve had to make a lot of difficult decisions lately, the kind that make a great Lifetime movie but suck when it happens to you in real life.

I am required to make many important and difficult decisions at work on a constant basis. I am having to make tough decisions at home as well. I am tired of feeling unwell much of the time, and have added trying to change my diet into the mix–something several friends have suggested I hold off doing right now. I see their point, but I also desperately want to feel better. Changing my eating habits does seem to make a difference in that, despite bringing its own stresses to the mix. But it’s more decision-making.

This past weekend, another one of my elderly animals has begun showing disquieting symptoms. I found myself literally paralyzed in determining what was best to do for him. Do I put him through extensive diagnostics when he is nearing the end of his natural lifespan in the hopes of finding something treatable? Knowing the stress of such tests could kill him? This is a spooky little cat who hates being handled and definitely freaks going to the vet. I know in my heart the likelihood of finding something treatable is pretty slim, so I’ve been going round and round, making and unmaking my decisions, certain one minute I will take one course of action, only to change my mind a few hours later.

Deep breath.

Because that’s what you have to do when decision fatigue sets in. You have to take a step back. Take a deep breath. Look at your decision logically. Take the emotional component out of the picture for a moment.

For years, I’ve had a firm policy: no important decisions without a fully belly and good night’s sleep. Most decisions don’t have to be made on the spur of the moment, so if you have the time, take it. Don’t leap into action without making sure you’re in the best frame of mind to make a good choice. This addresses the fatigue portion of the problem. Don’t discount that. We make our worst decisions when we are emotionally and physically wiped out. If at all possible, sleep on your decision-making. Many times your subconscious will show you the way overnight and you’ll wake up with the realization of what you should do.

For many people, this is what prayer does for them. If you are of a religious persuasion, pray about your decision. The acting of praying about something is another means of putting some distance between you and the problem and giving yourself time to sort it out. Just remember, if you ‘turn something over to God’, you’re not supposed to snatch it back and worry over it. That sort of looks like you don’t trust God to handle it. 🙂

Talk with your friends and family. Get their opinions. It’s not likely they will all agree, but it is likely that the people who care about you will give you some indication as to whether you’re on the right track or not. Moreover, you may find overwhelming support for one decision over another and make your choice easier.

Forgive yourself for not being perfect. This is a biggie with decision fatigue, I find. Part of the inability to make a decision stems from the paralyzing fear it will be the wrong one. Yes, you make make the wrong choice. The consequences could be greater than just slipping off your diet plan. But you’re making the best decision you can with the information you have at hand. You’re not setting out to deliberately make an unwise choice. Let your fear go.

Remember many decisions are not irreversible. If you discover you didn’t make the right choice, chances are you can change direction and modify your course. It’s highly unlikely you’ll wind up in an oubliette like Sarah in Labyrinth.

 

But even if you do, remember, Sarah got out in the end.

Tell me what you think!